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So far Pamela Rowe, MA, CCC-SLP has created 113 blog entries.

Getting the most out of your health care provider

Studies show good health is all important There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don’t look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn’t anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc. But not just any good diet Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words Exercsie is also just as important Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words Proin libero tellus, ultrices eu vehicula sed

Best practices in finding the right insurance for your needs

Studies show good health is all important There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don’t look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn’t anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc. But not just any good diet Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words Exercsie is also just as important Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words Proin libero tellus, ultrices eu vehicula sed

New ways to prevent heart attacks

Studies show good health is all important There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don’t look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn’t anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc. But not just any good diet Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words Exercsie is also just as important Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words Proin libero tellus, ultrices eu vehicula sed

Speech Therapists Improve Reading and Literacy Skills

Speech-Language Pathologists Improve Reading and Literacy Skills by Marie Ann Lopez Yes. Language learning is complex. Nevertheless, children acquire language automatically as a result of direct interactions with their caregivers and their surroundings. It is important to note that language learning develops in stages: different stages requiring different hurdles to be met and mastered. Although no two children are alike when it comes to language learning, the order in which the stages are reached are essentially the same. According to the American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA), language-based learning disabilities are “problems with age-appropriate reading, spelling, and/or writing”. The term language-based learning disabilities encompasses a wide range of difficulties in both written and spoken language. Some of these difficulties are apparent when a child is, for example, spelling, learning the alphabet, and expressing ideas. Let’s highlight that these types of disabilities do not correlate with intelligence levels. In fact, most people diagnosed with language-based learning disabilities range from an average to superior intelligence. Parents and educators take the frontline in detecting language-based learning disabilities. During the critical years of language acquisition it is imperative to closely monitor your child’s development in an effort to uncover any language-learning disabilities early on. The early detection will pave way to necessary intervention, if appropriate. If a language-based learning disability is identified, a Speech-Language Pathologist is recommended. As certified professionals, Speech-Language Pathologists play a crucial role evaluating a child’s written and spoken language to determine what are the child’s specific needs.  Based on the results, the Speech-Language Pathologist establishes a customized plan for the child. Speech-Language Pathologists are able to use a wide range of resources including, but not limited to, classroom material to personalize the lessons. Furthermore, they

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Myths and Facts

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Myths and Facts (Excerpt From Autism Spectrum Disorder: Myths and Facts) Myth: Children and adults with autism spectrum disorders prefer to self-isolate. Fact: Children and adults with an ASD often want to socially interact but lack the ability to spontaneously develop effective social interaction skills. Myth: Children and adults with an ASD cannot learn social skills. Fact: Children and adults with autism spectrum disorders can learn social skills if they receive individualized, specialized instruction and training. Social skills may not develop simply as the result of daily life experiences. Myth: Autism spectrum disorders are caused by poor parenting or parental behavior. Fact: Parents do not and cannot cause autism spectrum disorders. Although the multiple causes of all autism spectrum disorders are not known, it IS known that parental behavior before, during and after pregnancy does not cause autism spectrum disorders to develop. Myth: ASD is a behavioral/emotional/mental health disorder. Fact: Autism related disorders are developmental disabilities and neuro-biological disorders. These disorders manifest in early childhood (usually before the age of three or four) and are likely to last the lifetime of the person. Myth: People with autism spectrum disorders cannot have successful lives as contributing members of society. Fact: Many people with autism spectrum disorders are being successful living and working and are contributing to the well being of others in their communities. This is most likely to happen when appropriate services are delivered during the child’s free, appropriate, public education years. Myth: Autism spectrum disorders get worse as children get older. Fact: Autism spectrum disorders are not degenerative. Children and adults with autism should continuously improve. They are most likely to improve with specialized, individualized services and opportunities for supported inclusion. If

Three Helpful Tips for Reading To Young Children

Three Helpful Tips for Reading to Young Children by Marie Ann Lopez Can you spare 15 minutes? What if I told you it will change your child’s life. Yes! Reading fifteen minutes a day can change your child’s life. In the early stages of their lives, children build solid foundations and develop very important skills. It is no surprise that reading is an essential part of a child’s development. Research conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics proves that reading to children starting at birth has tremendous benefits. Dr. Pamela High wrote a policy based on the research detailing the benefits of the study. According to the study reading positively impacts areas of the brain related to “narrative comprehension and mental imagery in preschool children”. She describes reading to young children as a “vehicle for assessing how well the child is doing developmentally” and simultaneously “for assessing the relationship between the parent and the child.” The national campaign “Read Aloud 15 MINUTES” calls on parents to take at least fifteen minutes to engage their children in reading, beginning at birth. There is so much to gain. Reading will be a way for you and your child to share an enlightening and fun experience. The following tips will hopefully make reading even more exiting each day: Sometimes it might seem hard to get a child to become interested in reading. Just remember it all starts with you. Set the tone by showing your child how exciting it can be to enter the magical world of reading. Reading can certainly teach your child about our world but it can also help them embark in a journey of endless possibilities with their imagination. They might just need you to

Typical Speech and Language Development for Children 1-2 years old

There is a typical sequence of speech, language, hearing development for children of all ages. Below is a quick look at communication developmental milestones for a 1 to 2 year old child. Milestones are tasks and behaviors your child should be able to exhibit or produce at this age. HEARING AND UNDERSTANDING Points to a few body parts when asked. Follows simple commands and understands simple questions (“Roll the ball,” “Kiss the baby,” “Where’s your shoe?”). Listens to simple stories, songs, and rhymes. Points to pictures in a book when named. TALKING Says more words every month. Uses some one- or two- word questions (“Where kitty?” “Go bye-bye?” “What’s that?”). Puts two words together (“more cookie,” “no juice,” “mommy book”). Uses many different consonant sounds at the beginning of words. If your child is having difficulty completing any of these tasks, talk with your Pediatrician or call Pamela Rowe Speech Therapy of Jacksonville for more information. Your child may benefit from a Speech and Language Evaluation and possible Speech and/or Language Therapy. Click here for a few tips on increasing your child’s communication at this age. Source: http://www.asha.org/public/speech/development/12/

Quick Tips for Increasing your Child’s Communication Skills: Ages 1-2

If you feel that your 1 or 2 year old’s communication skills are delayed, do not “wait it out” or stay paralyzed in fear. In addition to contacting a Speech Language Pathologist, you can set aside 2-3 times a day to work on your child’s communication skills. Below are some ways you can work on your child’s communication in the home: Talk while doing things and going places. When taking a walk in the stroller, for example, point to familiar objects (e.g., cars, trees, and birds) and say their names. “I see a dog. The dog says ‘woof.’ This is a big dog. This dog is brown.” Use simple but grammatical speech that is easy for your child to imitate. Take a sound walk around your house or in the baby’s room. Introduce him/her to Timmy Clock, who says “t-t-t-t.” Listen to the clock as it ticks. Find Mad Kitty Cat who bites her lip and says “f-f-f-f” or Vinnie Airplane who bites his lip, turns his voice motor on and says “v-v-v-v.” These sounds will be old friends when your child is introduced to phonics in preschool and kindergarten. Make bath time “sound playtime” as well. You are eye-level with your child. Play with Peter Tugboat, who says “p-p-p-p.” Let your child feel the air of sounds as you make them. Blow bubbles and make the sound “b-b-b-b.” Feel the motor in your throat on this sound. Engines on toys can make a wonderful “rrr-rrr-rrr” sound. Expand on words. For example, if your child says “car,” you respond by saying, “You’re right! That is a big red car.” Continue to find time to read to your child every day. Try to find books with large pictures and

Help For Patients with Alzheimer’s and Dementia and Their Caregivers

Help For Patients with Alzheimer’s and Dementia and Their Caregivers by Mary Barr The diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease or Dementia is a life-changing event. One may be tempted to throw in the towel and lose all hope. The diagnosis does not have to be the end of one’s story. Therapy and treatment can be effective in developing strategies and improving quality of life. Throughout the treatment process, Speech Language Pathologists (SLPs) play a key role in giving the patient independence for the remainder of their life.  To keep this independence, SLPs focus on cognition, communication, and swallowing (ASHA).  Their goal is to “help the person with dementia use strategies to preserve communication and cognitive functioning for as long as possible” (ASHA).  The strategies include: making directions for daily tasks, starting and maintaining a memory book to recall past events, and teaching caregivers how to communicate with the patients.  For patients with issues swallowing, SLPs teach the patients safety measures when swallowing and they may also suggest a change in diet. SLPs work directly with caregivers to ensure the patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s is getting the best care while they are at home.  Some techniques given by SLPs are: Repeating key information Providing choices rather than asking open-ended questions Create written cues Keep information short and simple More techniques and resources can be found on the ASHA website.  They also suggest that caregivers attend support groups when coping and handling the stress of being a caregiver.   Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are life changing.  Having a supportive team of professionals caring for these individuals is important for sustaining a healthy life for both the patients and the caregivers. Contact Pamela Rowe Speech Therapy of Jacksonville for more information.  

Typical Speech and Language Development for Children 2-3 years old

There is a typical sequence of speech, language, hearing development for children of all ages. Below is a quick look at communication developmental milestones for a 2 to 3 year old child. Milestones are tasks and behaviors your child should be able to exhibit or produce at this age. HEARING AND UNDERSTANDING Understands differences in meaning (“go-stop,” “in-on,” “big-little,” “up-down”). Follows two requests (“Get the book and put it on the table”). Listens to and enjoys hearing stories for longer periods of time TALKING Has a word for almost everything. Uses two- or three- words to talk about and ask for things. Uses k, g, f, t, d, and n sounds. Speech is understood by familiar listeners most of the time. Often asks for or directs attention to objects by naming them. Asks why? May stutter on words or sounds If your child is having difficulty completing any of these tasks, talk with your Pediatrician or call Pamela Rowe Speech Therapy of Jacksonville for more information. Your child may benefit from a Speech and Language Evaluation and possible Speech and/or Language Therapy. Click here for a few tips on increasing your child’s communication at this age. Source: http://www.asha.org/public/speech/development/12/